In response to documentary ‘Enjoy Poverty’

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In previous decades, photographs of conflicts registered horror and fear of the foreigner. In the 1960s, scenes shot on streets around the world now more often converted our horror and fear to moral outrage directed at our own nationals and leaders. Even the photographer isn’t free of judgement In the early 1970s, Susan Sontag famously wrote that “Photographing is essentially an act of non-intervention. Part of the horror of such memorable coups of contemporary photojournalism as the pictures of a Vietnamese bonze reaching for the gasoline can, of a Bengali guerrilla in the act of bayoneting a trussed-up collaborator, comes from the awareness of how plausible it has become, in situations where the photographer has the choice between a photograph and a life, to choose the photograph. The person who intervenes cannot record; the person who is recording cannot intervene.” And if this is the choice of the photographer, then we must be complicit in that choice, given that it is our demand the photographer meets.

Reference: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/g-roger-denson/you-say-you-want-a-revolu_4_b_1167215.html

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One thought on “In response to documentary ‘Enjoy Poverty’

  1. “And if this is the choice of the photographer, then we must be complicit in that choice, given that it is our demand the photographer meets.” – Great, and what do you think? analyse/ expand…
    -y

    Like

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